Good Nature Organic Lawn Care Blog

Month: April 2013

Quackgrass... Do not Call me Crabgrass

April 25, 2013 by Alec McClennan

Quackgrass is a weedy grass that probably gets its feelings hurt every time someone refers to it as crabgrass. Crabgrass gets all the glory. Its understandable to confuse quackgrass for crabgrass because they have some similar characteristics, a coarse leaf blade and lime green color that causes it to look different from the rest of the lawn. Heres a picture of Quackgrass taken this spring. If you see something that looks like crabgrass in the early spring in the midwest, you can be almost 100% sure that it isnt true crabgrass. Old Fashioned Tall Fescue is another grass that commonly is confused with crabgrass. Who cares whether its crabgrass, Tall Fescue or quackgrass you ask? Its still ugly and you still dont want it right? Well, it matters because if you dont know what type of grass youre dealing with, its difficult to know how to eliminate it. For example, pretend you see quackgrass in your lawn and assume its crabgrass, you might decide to apply a natural pre-emergent crabgrass

Posted in Organic Lawn Care, Corn Gluten Meal, Weeds, Crabgrass

Mayfield Village Goes Organic!

April 22, 2013 by Alec McClennan

Mayfield Village has made a big commitment to go organic with their turf care and keep their residents from being exposed to lawn pesticide applications. Of particular note is the fact that theyre treating their 6 athletic fields organically which will keep hundreds of children from being exposed to lawn pesticides. Way to go Mayfield Village! See the story on Patch.com Here

Posted in Oranic Lawn Care, In The News, Choosing An Organic Lawn Care Company

Can I Seed if I Applied Corn Gluten Meal?

April 11, 2013 by Alec McClennan

We get this question a lot. You want to apply corn gluten meal to help feed your lawn and discourage weeds like crabgrass from germinating but you have some bare spots that youd like to seed. What to do? In my experience, Corn Gluten Meal seems to allow perennial grasses to sprout more easily than annual weeds. I have no idea why thats the case. But, it means that it is generally ok to seed spots in your lawn even if you have put down corn gluten meal. For best seeding results, Id recommend applying the corn gluten meal over your entire lawn and then going around to the bare spots in your lawn and seeding them with a spot seeding mix like our Pro Mix Lawn Patch Repair Seed. It contains a blend that will tolerate sun or shade pretty well and get established quickly. In addition, it has recycled newspaper fibers that help hold water near the seed AND a special polymer gel that keeps everything from washing away. Its a great choice for fixing bare patches in your lawn. Note: If youve renovated

Posted in Organic Lawn Care, Grass Seed, Lawn Tips, Organic Fertilizer, How To, Corn Gluten Meal

Another Reason I Don't Like Lawn Chemicals

April 08, 2013 by Alec McClennan

It finally felt like spring this past weekend and it was great to get outside and enjoy the beautiful weather. The only downside of this time of year is the spring lawn chemical applications everyone puts down. One of my big pet peeves is walking through the neighborhood and trying to figure out which lawn is producing the chemical smell so that we can try to avoid it. In the picture below, youll notice big piles of fertilzier / weed preventer AND a huge amount of bare spots. Chemical Pre Emergent Weed Killer and Fertilizer Application This photo bothers me for a few reasons, here they are: 1. It Smells The area just stunk of chemicals. Its hard to tell my 3 year old (notice the caped biker up ahead) to stop breathing as he rolls by. Chemicals can enter your system through inhalation, so it isnt crazy to try to hold your breath as you walk by lawns treated with chemicals. Kids are more susceptible to the issues these chemicals cause too. 2. It Follows You Home The sidewalk

Posted in Organic Lawn Care, Perennial Ryegrass, Tips, Spring Lawn Tips, Snow Mold, Lawn Tips, Applying Fertilizer, How To, Corn Gluten Meal

Making Good Use of the Invasive Garlic Mustard Plant

April 03, 2013 by Alec McClennan

It is likely you have this invasive plant growing behind your garage, in your back woods, or other forgotten areas of your property. This plant grows fast and spreads each year, threatening to take over entire areas. The problem with invasive plants like Garlic Mustard is that they do not allow other plants to survive and eliminate the essential biodiversity in nature. But... if life gives you Garlic Mustard, why not make pesto? The Western Reserve Land Conservancyagrees that the great flavor found is Garlic Mustard is the silver lining to this regional issue. On Thursday, April 11th, from 6-8:30pm at the Miller Nature Preserve in Lake Metroparks, The Western Reserve Land Conservancy is giving a workshop on different techniques to use when cooking with this plant. Here is the description off their site: In the name of charity, Chef Mario G. Izzo is preparing to turn an unwanted plant into culinary delights for the tastebuds of those attending a Pest (o) Soiree at the Lorain County

Posted in Invasive Plants
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